tequila

Tequila sales increase due to pandemic but farmers see no profit

Tequila sales have been boosted by the coronavirus pandemic, but agave farmers are not as successful.

Enjoying worldwide success from the United States to the United Kingdom, tequila is breaking records throughout the production chain. From the furrows to the export companies. Tequila production in Mexico was 128 million liters in the first half of 2020, 4% more compared to the same period in 2019. Exports increased by 3.6%. And these figures are evident in spite of the crisis.

 

Globally, production has been growing at an average of between 5% and 7% per year for the last 15 years

In fact, in 2019, it broke a record with 330 million liters. The United States is the potential buyer with more than 88% of sales from Mexico.

Despite the great success of tequila, those who work from level zero, growing agave, see no benefit. As an example, two farmers. In El Arenal, Zeferino González reveals to laopinion.com that they do not see the “tequila fever” reflected in their pockets. Zeferino maintains this family tradition of cultivating the agave Tequilana weber, a blue variety, the only official agave for producing tequila. In his 10 hectares with 30,000 plants he says, “I was not good at studies and what I had left was to continue doing what my father also did”.

The coronavirus brought as a consequence for producers like Zeferino a drop in price. “The price of mezcal (pineapple) for maguey was lowered from 29 pesos in January to 21 pesos today, despite the increase in demand.

Zeferino González recognizes that despite the fact that sales are below last year, the 21 pesos per kilo are not bad. He compares this moment with past and hard times when pineapple was worth so little that they preferred to waste it, than to cover harvest costs.

 

Don’t drink and drive. Enjoy responsibly.

Tequila sales have been boosted by the coronavirus pandemic, but agave farmers are not as successful.