cocktail - cocktail glasses

Your best guide to cocktail glasses is here! 6 types to know

When you make your drinks, you have the ingredients and method… but what about the cocktail glasses? Find your guide here.

We create cocktails with the right ingredients, the required steps, and the will of doing them, OF course. But there is one important element that has been conceived for each type of drink: cocktail glasses! They are as important as your gin or your rum, or your garnish…

Glassware plays a very important role in mixology, in fact, there are glasses that have been specially created for certain types of liquids and to properly taste a cocktail.

But more than that, why is it so important to select the right glasses and cocktail glasses?

Beyond aesthetics, glasses and glasses influence taste, temperature, and aroma

 

Here is a list of cocktail glasses

 

Coupe

Photo by Ambitious Creative Co. – Rick Barrett on Unsplash

We begin our guide to cocktail glasses and tumblers with the glass commonly used in the Daiquiri is easy to hold in your hands and keeps the drink in even when the glass wobbles. Glasses of this style, also called coupe, are used for cocktails that are served “up”.

This means they are shaken with ice and served chilled. Like the martini glass, the foot allows the drink to stay cold.

 

Rocks or lowball

Photo by Martina Alpeza on Unsplash

This type of glass, also known as Old-Fashioned for the cocktail, is often used for short drinks or short drinks. Think Negroni, for example.

The glass is perfect for cocktails served “down”, i.e. cold, but in a stemless glass. These glasses make it easier to appreciate the aroma. The ice they contain helps to maintain a constant temperature.

The rocks glass can serve cocktails with ice, although it is not a prerequisite. It would include a large chunk of ice, which allows the drink to be savored for a longer time; this is why Negronis are usually served in rocks glasses.

 

Margarita coupe

Photo by Kike Salazar N on Unsplash

This glass is best known for its stem and wide bowl, or fun double bowls.

These glasses can come in different sizes: the smaller ones are good for cocktails without ice and the larger ones are ideal for iced margaritas.

Designed to allow for the iconic salt or sugar rim. Salt can enhance flavors, especially if mixed with citrus. And while sugar itself is not a flavor enhancer, it can pair well with various elements of the cocktail.

The glass is a variant of the Champagne Coupe, which is often used for champagne or sparkling wines. Indispensable for your pantry of glasses and cocktail glasses.

 

Tumbler or Highball

Photo by Stanislav Ivanitskiy on Unsplash

The highball glass is a glass that can hold between 240 and 350 ml. It is used for serving highball cocktails and other mixes. Example of a highball glass size: 7 cm in diameter and 15 cm in height A highball glass is larger than an Old Fashioned glass and shorter and wider than a Collins glass.

Keep this in mind for your glasses and glasses for whiskey-based cocktails for example.

 

Collins Glass

Photo by Ambitious Creative Co. – Rick Barrett on Unsplash

A Collins glass is a glass tumbler that typically holds between 300 and 400 ml. It is often used interchangeably with a Highball glass, but there are slight differences between the two.

It is used to serve mixers, especially Tom Collins or John Collins cocktails.

It is cylindrical in shape, narrower, and taller than a highball glass.

 

Martini glass/coupe

Photo by Hazal Tanker

For the last of our guide to cocktail glasses, we bring in the ancestor of the Martini glass. It is simply known as the cocktail glass, and today the two are often confused.

A subtype of the cocktail glass, the martini glass is distinguished by its V-shaped glass, long stem and circular base.

 

Welcome yourself to our Spirits Hunters Weekly Newsletter.

 

Don’t drink and drive. Enjoy responsibly.

 

Join the community on Reddit

Spirits Hunters is a community dedicated to spirits and the world of mixology. Feel free to talk about the world of mixology and bartending here!

Join